Hampstead Arts Festival WORDS Weekend Day 2

13 November 2016
  • 13:00

Hampstead Arts Festival WORDS Weekend Day 2

Sunday, 13th November, 1pm

Tim Bale

 BOOK HERE

Is the Political Party really over?
With voters less tribal than ever and fewer and fewer people willing to regularly commit their time and energy to traditional political activity, are parties as we've always known them in terminal decline? Or do recent surges in membership for, among others the SNP, Labour, and the Greens, suggest that there's life in the old dogs yet? Can and how should parties re-invent themselves for the 21st Century?

Tim Bale graduated from Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge.  After teaching English in Spain, he did a Masters Degree at Northwestern University in the USA.  Following a few years spent working for the NHS, he returned to do a PhD at the Department of Politics at Sheffield University, where he then lectured for a year.  After Sheffield, he taught politics at Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand until 2003 and then at Sussex University until 2012. For four years he was the co-editor of the European Journal of Political Research's annual Political Data Yearbook.  In 2008 he won the Political Studies Association's Bernard Crick Prize for Outstanding Teaching.  He was the co-founder of the PSA's specialist group on Conservatives and Conservatism.  He also provides an Internet Guide to European Politics to accompany his book, European Politics: a Comparative Introduction, the third edition of which was published in the spring of 2013. Tim's media work includes writing for the Financial Times and the Guardian, and he has appeared on various BBC radio and television programmes.  In 2011 he received the Political Studies Association's W.J.M. Mackenzie prize for his book The Conservative Party from Thatcher to Cameron.  His latest books are The Conservatives since 1945: the Drivers of Party Change.  and Five Year Mission. The Labour Party under Ed Miliband.  He occasionally tweets @ProfTimBale. You can find his non-academic writing on his blog.